How Do I Join Second Baptist Church?

For well over a century, Second Baptist Church has practiced “open membership”, which means that we accept your baptism from other Christian traditions.

We welcome and do not require or expect re-baptism. For those making first-time decisions of faith, we baptize by immersion. If you are interested in becoming a member of Second Baptist Church, or finding out more information about our church, please speak with the pastor or moderator after the service. You can also e-mail our pastor, Steve Mechem, at stevemechem@gmail.com.

Who Are We?

Who are we?

The people who gather together as Second Baptist Church have been doing so for a long time. In 1833, after the very first Baptist Church in St. Louis disbanded, a few brave souls founded Second Baptist Church. For 180 years, through various and sundry pastors, in several buildings, Second Baptist Church has remained faithful to its original calling- to be people of faith in this place.

What to Expect at Second

We worship on Sunday mornings at 10:30 a.m. Parking spaces for people with physical disabilities are reserved on the north side of the building in the upper parking lot. For those parking in the lower lots, a set of stairs meets you as you enter the building.

Contact Us

Have a question or comment? We would love to hear from you by phone, e-mail or postal mail.

Where Are We?

Second Baptist is located at a central suburban St. Louis crossroads. Our address is 9030 Clayton Road, 3/10 of a mile west of the Galleria Shopping Center at McKnight Road, less than a mile north of the I-64 intersection. Although Second Baptist Church is located in Richmond Heights, we are truly a community church for the entire metropolitan St. Louis community and have members throughout the city and counties.

This We Believe...

The Second Baptist Church stands for freedom of the individual in all matters of faith and practice of religion. Such a belief and such a spirit is a challenge to live with all one's powers and creativeness in fulfilling God's purpose. Tradition is worthless if it does not give strength and vision for the present and hope for the future. The tradition of freedom in this Church is truly a spirit which has been passed on to our generation. It is the very atmosphere of our Church, the refreshing air we breathe.